Closed Door Policy

Honor Time Without Announcing It

I have a closed door policy.  Don’t @ me.

Announcing an open door policy as part of a leadership philosophy is like a pitcher announcing he’s going to throw the ball to the plate. Yes, of course it’s supposed to happen but having to tell people about it seems disingenuous.

When my door is closed, I’m with a troubled 9-year old who “doesn’t understand the point of living.”

When my door is closed, I’m with a first-year teacher who just needs to vent and admit that she is very tired.

When my door is closed, I’m on the phone with the superintendent because I want to triple check before I call DCP&P and create further chaos in a 5-year old’s life.

When my door is closed, I’m finishing up a hug with a teacher who can finally announce her first pregnancy after years of IVF.

When my door is closed, I’m conducting a post-observation after one of the best lessons I’ve seen in my time in leadership.

When my door is closed, a veteran teacher is in tears as she tells me she just can’t do it anymore and needs to retire.

When my door is closed, a smiling 8-year old is coloring while I try to contact her step father who has forgotten to pick her up. Again.

When my door is closed, I am decompressing, if only for a moment, after my door was closed all day.

So much happens behind closed doors every day. Imagine what we’d miss if those doors remained open.

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