Then and Now: A 10 Year Challenge

#ColleagueCorner is an occasional series which reminds us that our greatest resource is each other. Through human connection and shared experience, these stories provide us a glimpse into our colleagues’ world, a world we all share as educators. 

Jenn Floyd is an excellent teacher. Rather than play superlative roulette, I’ll just leave it at that. Her 2nd graders experience, rather than simply receive, education. From countless, creative ways to deliver content to well-timed, deeply personal random acts of kindness, Jenn is the foundation on which elementary schools are built. She’s also on her way to an educational leadership degree, so I’ll need to soak it up because she’ll be leading her own school very soon.


If you’re anything like me, you’ve spent the last few months cynically rolling your eyes at celebrities’ “10 Year Challenge” photos as you scroll through your social media feed. Are we all going to just turn a blind eye to the amount of filters these pictures contain and reply with heart-eyed emojis instead?  I’d much rather keep my “glory days” behind me, wrinkles under concealer, and roots under the occasional touch up of hair dye.

That is, until Read Across America Week this year.

Like any typical elementary school, the first week of March includes a sea of red and white striped top hats roaming through the building while celebrating Dr. Seuss’s work. Throughout the week, students and staff lined the halls for a school-wide reading hour, teachers swapped classrooms to read their favorite books, and parents brought in green eggs and ham – and my favorite French Toast casserole – during our renowned “Books and Breakfast” celebration.   Points for crazy hats, wacky socks, and pajamas were tallied and tweeted as classrooms worked together to show their Seuss spirit.

During one particular event, high school students joined each elementary class to share their love of Seuss.  As I welcomed the former students through the main entrance of our building, one familiar smile jumped out at me.  As I showed him the way to my second grade classroom, I had an immediate flashback to a time during my student teaching practicum – 10 years ago.  

Sitting in front of a group of second graders as a twenty-something practicum student was both nerve-racking and a dream come true.  My cooperating teacher gave me my first task: class read aloud. Not bad, right?  Each day after lunch, the students sat on the edge of their seats, anxiously awaiting the day’s story.

My cooperating teacher taught me all of her read aloud tricks – including editing Junie B. Jones when her responses were a little too fresh and modifying character names when they were too much of a tongue twister.  What I wasn’t prepared for was the slew of dinosaur names discussed in Magic Tree House: Dinosaurs Before Dark.  Needless to say, there were no strategies to avoid the words introduced in this book’s adventure.

Pteranodon has a silent p, right?

One day, as the students waited for the twists and turns that Jack and Annie would face during their journey, I found myself on an adventure of my own.  Luckily, one student in particular was well versed in dinosaur and quickly came to my rescue like a scene straight out of Jurassic Park.  

“It’s Ter-an-uh-don,” Noah stated, as I stumbled over the first few syllables.  Surprised – and a bit relieved – I quietly acknowledged his help and continued on.

As you would expect, the Pteranodon was a main character in the story, and the word came up quite often.  Each time I began mumbling the letters, he would quickly jump in. “Ter-an-uh-don,” he would repeat, time and time again.

Well-prepared questions and thoughtful conversations aside – this was the moment that stuck.

10 Years Later this high schooler was now the one sitting in the teacher’s seat with his favorite Dr. Seuss themed book in hand: The Cat in the Hat Knows a Lot About That: All About Dinosaurs.  After sharing his memory of me, in his second grade classroom, and his love for the species – that stemmed back to his childhood – he began to read.  My students sat on the edge of their seats as he read every rhyme, displayed the colorful pictures, and shared the importance of the glossary in the back of the book.  We then snapped a few pictures for Twitter and said our goodbyes.

This former student and the read aloud moment that stuck with me has inspired me to begin my own 10 Year Challenge:  

Rather than getting bogged down by the next big thing in standardized testing or losing yourself in the endless piles to grade, spend the next 10 years focusing on those small moments within your classroom – and within your life – that will always make you smile.  

The next 10 will be gone before you know it, and unlike the latest trends or pop culture icons, the meaningful moments can never be photoshopped.

Jenn Floyd (@floyd4edu) spends her days in second grade in Collingswood, NJ, where it’s cool to be kind. She has a Masters in Reading Specialist/Literacy Coach and is currently working toward a degree in School Administration at Rowan University. When she’s not counting words for her annual NaNoWriMo writing club, you can find Jenn, and her husband Zach, checking out the best local bookstores and ice cream shops that the east coast has to offer.